Journals

Latest news and scientific research from China and Asia. 
  1. For the past seven years, 70-year-old Singaporean Julia Lee has rarely travelled overseas. Her most recent trip was one night away, in neighbouring Malaysia.Since being diagnosed with kidney disease, Lee has spent 10 hours each day hooked up to a 20-kilogram machine, making it difficult to move around.Chronic renal disease results in a loss of kidney function, meaning the patient’s body is unable to clear the blood of waste and excess fluids. Dialysis – the treatment Lee goes through which…
  2. It is a tantalising prospect for traders whose success often hinges on microseconds: a desktop PC algorithm that crunches market data faster than today’s most advanced supercomputers.Japan’s Toshiba says it has the technology to make such rapid-fire calculations a reality – not quite quantum computing, but perhaps the next best thing. The claim is being met with a mix of intrigue and scepticism at financial firms in Tokyo and around the world.Toshiba’s “Simulated Bifurcation Algorithm” is…
  3. China is aiming to increase its reliance on domestic production for key components, including chips and controlling systems, to 75 per cent by 2025, according to a former minister.The target reflects Beijing’s determination to reduce its dependence on imports by expanding its national manufacturing innovation centres to 40 from the 15 at the end of 2019.Domestic production can currently only provide around a third of the key components required by China, but Li Yizhong, the former industry and…
  4. Household appliance giant Dyson is broadening the technology role of its Singapore research and development team as part of the plan to shift its UK headquarters to the Asian island nation.Dyson has started recruiting for “early stage research projects specifically in Singapore,” Charlie Park, Dyson's global category director for environmental care, said in an interview on Thursday.Originally run as a subsidiary of the UK parent, the Singapore operation had been “purely supporting late stage…
  5. China granted 453,000 invention patents last year, up almost 5 per cent year on year, as the country vows to step up regulations to protect intellectual property amid charges of widespread IP abuses that have been a focal point in the ongoing US-China trade war.The total import and export of intellectual property fees from January to November 2019 exceeded US$37 billion, already topping the US$35 billion for all of 2018, according to a statement from China’s National Intellectual Property…
  6. Alibaba Group Holding’s science and technology innovation brain trust predicts the top tech trends of the new year will mainly revolve around the rapid advances expected in the fields of artificial intelligence (AI) and the industrial Internet of Things (IoT).The forecast was made by the Alibaba Damo Academy, which has facilities in seven cities across Asia. New York-listed e-commerce giant Alibaba is the parent company of the South China Morning Post.The other major trends are faster…
  7. A Google artificial intelligence system proved as good as expert radiologists at detecting which women had breast cancer based on screening mammograms and showed promise at reducing errors, researchers in the United States and Britain reported.The study, published in the journal Nature on Wednesday, is the latest to show that artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to improve the accuracy of screening for breast cancer, which affects one in eight women globally.Radiologists miss about 20…
  8. Chinese search giant Baidu has beaten Microsoft and Google in an ongoing natural language processing competition, thanks to the linguistic differences between Chinese and English.Baidu’s model, called ERNIE (Enhanced Representation through kNowledge IntEgration), recorded the highest score of 90.1 – just ahead of Microsoft and Google – on the General Language Understanding Evaluation (GLUE) benchmark and analysis platform for natural language understanding. Baidu’s model was first developed to…
  9. Creating art is a common way for humans to express themselves – and it is usually protected by copyright laws – but what if artificial intelligence (AI) did the same? If a writer used AI to complete Cao Xueqin’s famous unfinished Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber, who should own the copyright? Cao Xueqin, the writer, or the AI algorithm?“So far, there is no law specifically addressing ownership of AI-created work [in China],” said Liu Wenjie, a law professor at the Communication University…
  10. MIT engineers have devised a novel way to record a patient’s immunisation history: storing the information in a patterned dye that is invisible to the naked eye and delivered under the skin at the same time as the vaccine.It is designed to bridge the gap that exists in medical records, particularly in developing countries, and emits a near-infrared light that can be detected by a specially equipped smartphone.The new dye consists of nanocrystals called quantum dots and was described in the…